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Auto Theft Claims Master

Rob Painter

1-903-513-7808

Robo14@aol.com

Initial contact is free of charge in order be to understand your situation

Of course everything we discuss is always confidential!

I apologize if there is redundant information on other pages, but I am revising about 6 different websites with lots of different information, and I will edit when I have the time. I believe that I have addressed immediate concerns so you can understand your situation.

This will be geared to auto theft claims, but I consult on all personal property claims such as renters, homeowners, and boat claims. I have also been involved in commercial business claims with successful outcomes. I average a 90 to 95% success rate in which the claims are settled with my intervention.

One might think with this success, I have an insurance sales or underwriting background. No, I do not have such experience.

Some might think I have some type of legal background. That would be correct, but not in the stadardized way like being a lawyer or a paralegal.

My experience has come the hard way serving as an expert witness giving hundreds and hundreds of hours of sworn testimoñy combined with the fact that I have been involved in every area of auto theft investigations for over 20 years working with Special Investigation Units across the country for just about any auto insurer out there.

I have learned a lot which I exploit for my client and I have taught these investigators for years.

I have formed great relationships with many of these people. Of course there are some who hate me, because I may destroy their case  they were building for denial.

When an insured suffers a loss on the beginning there is very little concern. After all, they have insurance, there should be a few questions about the theft event, but now it’s time to pay up with in 30 days!

Yeah, that was the good ole days, but it is not like that anymore.

When you submit your claim you will be required to give a recorded statement. This will be basic information about the theft and details surrounding it. They want accountability for all keys. Who else uses the vehicle? Any enemies? Any broken glass at the theft scene? Did the vehicle have an alarm? II highly suggest that you listen to the question well before answering. It simply does not look good for you to have to go back and change your answers.

I realize you may be in shock because someone iñvaded you personal space by stealing your property. Most people do not understand the emotions that pop up in these situations 7nless they have been in the same situation at one time in thier lives.

For example: you tell the claims rep that the car was parked at 6 pm. You went back to the car at 7 pm and you found it was no longer there. You speak with the friends you met that day and although the meeting was at 6, you were an hour late and did not arrive until 7 pm. This means your time line is totally off and an investigator will find out. Instead if correcting that answer that the insurance will look at as a misrepresentation of material fact, confirm with witnesses or friends what time the vehicle was stolen.

These investigations are not to find out who stol3 the vehicle! You need to be aware, this is an insurance fraud investigation and you are the target!

The first knee-jerk reaction is to retain an attorney. That is the last thing you would ever want to do in an SIU Investigation. This situation does not merit an attorney because it takes the Investigation to a snail’s pace. Now you can no longer have the option to speak with the investigator. Everything has to go through the attorney. Anyone that deals with attorneys know they are difficult to contact.

Another down side of using an attorney is a huge majority know less than you about auto theft claims protocol, putting you in the position of paying to train them! Auto theft claims are much different than personal injury or slip and fall. They require a specialist like me that has 28 years experience in these claims.

If you hire me to consult you through this witch Hunt, I make this so less a burden on your shoulders and chances of getting the claim settled go up exponentially, because thier ultimate goal is to deny the claim. This would be denied by the investigator, but just follow the money.

Who pays the investigator to investigate? The insurance carrier! If all claims are paid, what is the sense of paying the investigator?

You were probably denied because of the vehicle you drive. Most vehicles equipped with an anti-theft transponder are deemed unstealable by the insurance companies. This is due to the free training they get from their forensic experts.

There are major problems on that front that I will go into.

Basically, they are not a w-2 employee of the insurance company and are termed independent.

These experts have the audacity to accuse the insured of fraud!

You really can’t blame the investigator or the company. They don’t know you and you could certainly we’ll be submitting a false claim. That happens a lot!

It’s not always professional crooks submitting false claims.

It could be a neighbor that fell on hard times, possibly losing his job, owing more than the car is worth (under water), or maybe the wife went through an emergency operation. Bottom line, whatever the reason, here they are trying to illicitly collect that claim money. Although I feel bad for whatever financial situation they got themselves into, it is still a criminal act and I feel they should be prosecuted.

I have seen juries over look the crime andinsert emotion into their verdict in these hardship situations and that is something no one has control of.

There are also the professional scammers submitting bogus claims or at the very least ripped off the buyer of the car and when he submitted a theft claim after owning it for 3 years turned out to be an inadvertantly fraudulent clam.

My urpose here is not to attack the companies for investigating claims. Without the investigators, none of us would be able to afford comprehensive insurance. Before I go on as to the consulting, I want to put in context what these investigators deal with day in and day out, and you will realize the investigation is nothing personal, but some investigators get overzealous and in many cases, they were deliberately deceptive information by thier so-called “forensic” experts who’s reports are responsible for the subsequent investigation and potential denial of the claim. I assure you, this is not an accident or a simple mistake. These experts know the investigator is totally reliant on their bogus conclusions and they figure they will have opposition. When I have cases opposing them .as an expert, I slice and dice this clowns and illistrate to a Jury thier misrepresentations.

As the insured being investigated, it may be because the forensic expert inferred you are a liar and the car was last driven with one of your keys, even though it wasn’t. What? The investigator is supposed to believe you over their hand picked indepemdent forensic experts? Good luck on that!

Insurance Investigations

Some quick context of what investigators are up against:

10 years prior to a theft claim, a guy got a really good deal on a Ferrari. He purportedly paid $50k for a car valued over $100k at the time. I don’t know about you, but I would be thinking this deal is too good to be true and I would have ran away as fast as possible, but that is me.

In defense of the owner to justify this price was that the car did have a salvage/rebuilt title devaluing the vehicle by 35% do at that rate the vehicle was worth about $65k retail.$15k is one heck of a mark down. Something wasn’t right. The owner told me that the guy was his friend and was a dealer buying cars from the auctions all the time. In fact, he had what he thought to be receipts for the replacement parts to rebuild the car.

Fast forward 10 years. The buddy he bought the car from had died 5 years previous. The Ferarri got stolen. The car can had been insured for 10 years by the same major carrier. The car was not recovered, however the investigator reached out to their forensic experts to author a report about how the car was possible to steal because of it’s sophisticated anti-theft transponder system requiring the owner’s key to start the engine.

In case you did not realize it, these experts implicated owner’s involvement in the theft of the vehicle. They inspected absolutely no physical evidence and went solely off the description and operation theory about the design of the system in a service manual. The fact (assumption) was that the vehicle was driven at the time of the Theft. Towing could not even be eliminated, yet here the Certified Forensic Locksmith as an agent (subcontractor vendor) is accusing the insured of a crime with absolutely no physical evidence to support the accusation! Unfortunately, this happens Nationwide far too often. Unopposed, the insured’s lawyer would not know how to refuted the expert. Who would the jury believe? The Certified Forensic locksmith of course, because the jury would put this expert in a professional catagory because of the self-described term forensics in his title. Many members of juries from what I have been told are fascinated by TV shows like Forensic Files iles and CSI and put these experts in that real life TV catagory. Unfortunately, I have run into far too many incompetent attorneys confused by it all without thinking of the basics! The rreport and conclusions should be thrown out of court automatically because they are giving testimony on physical evidence they never viewed! Duh!This blows past attorneys all the time. Instead, they are more concerned about if that anti-theft system can be defeated. Of course it can, but what is the point? You are feeding into their bull crap that they actually we’re testifying on evidence they never had! Yeah, and these attorneys are not ashamed to charge lots of bucks for their idiocy!

This insured was dragged through an investigation because of these moron forensic experts because of a potential fraud claim that did not happen.

A day before the examination under oath, the insured called me back very concerned. I asked him what the problem was. He noticed the title for the Ferrari was a duplicate. 10 years he had to look at the title and the day before the EUO he tells me the title is a duplicate! Now, could be the original salvage got lost and a duplicate was issued. It could be there was a lien on the salvage title and someone “washed it” with a duplicate. At any rate it was a problem. We also don’t know when it happened through which state. The car was bought in Illinois but he had it registered in Florida where he moved to and his dead buddy had handled all of the paperwork.

I had spent 4 hours on the phone with him scripting him as to how to honestly answer all the questions. I gave him questions he never saw coming so he was fully prepared. I told him just like all my clients, my phone is open for any hicups during the EUO, take a break and call me if you have a problem question. And last but not least, call me after the EUO immediately in case we have to clarify something.

Well, I hadn’t heard from him. I don’t know how many times I tried to reach him, but on the fourth day, he called me!

I asked him what happened, everything should have gone very smooth. I had him covered to attack the forensic report and by all my work, the claim should have been paid.

He told me he went out and got drunk for 3 days.

I didn’t get it until he told me what went down. He told me the Insurance company told him if he admitted today that the car was Ferrari was stolen they would not press charges for receing stolen property. He did so accordingly.

Had he called me during the EUO, I would have told him what to say and do and chances are results would have been much more favorable to him. After all the carrier could have checked this out 10 years ago but didn’t and for 10 years had their hands out for the premium every year. In my view the insurce carrier aided and abetted in the posession of the stolen peoperty at the very least! Anyway, that is a claim that went wrong for everyone involved. At least the insurance company did not have to pay. The vehicle was never recovered. The insured didn’t have to contest the denial and get stuck with an incompetent attorney not having to cross examine the expert on their report based on no physical evidence.

The weirdest thing was the insured suspected forany reasons he told me afterward he had bought a stolen Ferrari. I sure don’t have $50k to throw away, but evidently the insured did. That consultant claim is one out of 4 that did not get to as planned. Over 10 years, I have hundreds and hundreds of claims with  I succesfully consulted in. Claims the insurance company had altready hadthe claim scheduled for denial. The problem here was not me but information the insured did not tell me about.

The Cloned Car That Was A Ghost

A cloned car does not exist and in merely a mirage.

In this case I was serving as an expert witness.

The insured bought the car from a Florida dealer. The vehicle was .Corverte.  it was being transported from NYC to Florida. The Vette had a NY title.

Because being from out of state, the vehicle required inspection. Vehicle was recorded as being inspected in Florida. Tirle was transferred from New York to Florida and car was registered and insured to the owner. He took photos of the Vette. The outside was green and interior was black.

The insured evidently enjoyed driving this car for 3 years. It was stolen from his driveway one night.

He did everything right. He reported the theft the cops. He submitted a claim to his insurer. He went over a no f above quizzing neighbors if they heard it saw anything coming from his driveway. No one saw or heard anything.

Since this vehicle was equipped with an anti-theft transponder Systems, it drew scrutiny because these vehicles according to insurance investigators can’t be stolen without the use of the owner’s key. The insured, because of the transponder was now under investigation.

NICB was now involved (National Insurance Crime Bureau) because a national check of the VIN was listed in Iowa.

NICB went to Iowa to check on this. They interviewed the owner who had bought the car new. He was asked if the car had been to New York? He said no. Has the car been out of state. He confirmed it had been to Illinois for car show. NICB took photos of the car, which happened to be the same colors the insured had in his photos.

He was asked if he ever had the car for sale on Craigslist list or anywhere else? His answer was no.

Next, the NICB attempted to contact the seller in New York finding the phone number was not valid anymore  They went to the address you seller had listed. That was a vacant block where houses no longer on the road.

They contacted New York Department of motor vehicle and gave them their summary about the Vette

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